Superheroes And Steak

mohala-sumiko:

this morning, police raided Greater St. Mark school/church in Ferguson, MO (formerly called St. Sebastian’s Parish).

community members had been using it as a safe space and staging area. police claim that the church is violating housing codes by sheltering protesters, even though the pastor has said it isn’t true.

please please please boost this. help these organizers recover the supplies they lost, and share just how fucking far these cops will sink to make the people of Ferguson suffer.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

This is my abuelita Esperanza. The anniversary of her death was a week ago, so she makes an appropriate addition to the efforts to desexualize the Latina tag. Here’s a little more about her and her badassery:
She was born in Tetelpa, Morelos to an impoverished family that managed to put her through college so she could become a schoolteacher.
She met my abuelito in his rancho when she was doing her mandatory in-class teaching requisite and married him despite her parents’ wishes for her to marry another college graduate.
There was only one time when my abuelito slipped up and thought he could get away with slapping her while they were living in a town that generally still allowed men to hit their wives. My abuelita responded by slamming him down onto the couch and repeatedly scratching his face. Once she finished, she said: “And the next time you touch me like that, I’ll KILL YOU.”
If there was a street harasser bothering her daughters, the next day after hearing about it, she would walk a few feet behind them pretending she didn’t know them as they walked to school and proceed to chase the harasser down the road when he approached the girls.
She routinely encouraged and helped women to leave their abusive husbands
When young boys would misbehave toward women, she would grab them by their ears and take them to their mothers and make them explain what they had been caught doing.
She would knock on the doors of abusers, harassers and rapists and punch them in the face before they got a chance to say anything.
One time a guy on the bus was pretending to fall asleep so his face would “accidentally” fall into the breasts of the woman sitting next to him, so my abuela grabbed his hair and slammed his head into the window, telling him she didn’t believe he was sleeping, but to turn the other way if he needed to rest so bad.
When my abuelita was in her 50s, my tío got really drunk and brought a woman home. The two kicked out his wife and kids, who went to my abuela for help. She went to my tío’s house, and when the woman accosted her, she grabbed her by the hair, dragged her outside and threw her in the street. She told her she should be ashamed for encouraging a drunk man who she didn’t know to throw a fellow woman and her children into the street. When my tío protested, she slapped him with a pan.
She spiraled into depression when my abuelito died. When her children, all grown by then, told her to snap out of it because her health was declining, she replied stoically: “You are all old enough to take care of yourselves now. I’m going to go be with your father.”

reclaimingthelatinatag:

This is my abuelita Esperanza. The anniversary of her death was a week ago, so she makes an appropriate addition to the efforts to desexualize the Latina tag. Here’s a little more about her and her badassery:

  • She was born in Tetelpa, Morelos to an impoverished family that managed to put her through college so she could become a schoolteacher.
  • She met my abuelito in his rancho when she was doing her mandatory in-class teaching requisite and married him despite her parents’ wishes for her to marry another college graduate.
  • There was only one time when my abuelito slipped up and thought he could get away with slapping her while they were living in a town that generally still allowed men to hit their wives. My abuelita responded by slamming him down onto the couch and repeatedly scratching his face. Once she finished, she said: “And the next time you touch me like that, I’ll KILL YOU.”
  • If there was a street harasser bothering her daughters, the next day after hearing about it, she would walk a few feet behind them pretending she didn’t know them as they walked to school and proceed to chase the harasser down the road when he approached the girls.
  • She routinely encouraged and helped women to leave their abusive husbands
  • When young boys would misbehave toward women, she would grab them by their ears and take them to their mothers and make them explain what they had been caught doing.
  • She would knock on the doors of abusers, harassers and rapists and punch them in the face before they got a chance to say anything.
  • One time a guy on the bus was pretending to fall asleep so his face would “accidentally” fall into the breasts of the woman sitting next to him, so my abuela grabbed his hair and slammed his head into the window, telling him she didn’t believe he was sleeping, but to turn the other way if he needed to rest so bad.
  • When my abuelita was in her 50s, my tío got really drunk and brought a woman home. The two kicked out his wife and kids, who went to my abuela for help. She went to my tío’s house, and when the woman accosted her, she grabbed her by the hair, dragged her outside and threw her in the street. She told her she should be ashamed for encouraging a drunk man who she didn’t know to throw a fellow woman and her children into the street. When my tío protested, she slapped him with a pan.
  • She spiraled into depression when my abuelito died. When her children, all grown by then, told her to snap out of it because her health was declining, she replied stoically: “You are all old enough to take care of yourselves now. I’m going to go be with your father.”

fascinasians:

fabulazerstokill:

harrysde:

From Elon James White Tuesday night.

This better have hundreds of thousands of notes at the end of the day or else

Important.

whatisthat-velvet:

angry-hippo:

socialismartnature:

The food you eat or brush you’re using may have been made by a worker earning less than a dollar an hour — not in the developing world, but in the invisible workforce inside America’s prisons. Share this if you oppose prison labor for profit.  Source: http://ow.ly/iwTlY

When I was in prison I worked 3 shifts a day, 5 days a week, starting at 5 AM and ending at 8 PM. I was paid $5.25 a month. Pay for the inmates who facilitate UNICOR workers (by making their food, washing their laundry, etc,) is even lower than the wages cited in the above graphics. The prison industry is also a slave industry, and it isn’t just corporations who benefit. All the furniture you see in federal buildings, post offices, DMVs, etc, where do you think it comes from? Prison labor. I think a lot of people know about states that use prison labor for license plates, but fewer people know that the plaques on doors at city halls, and sometimes the doors themselves, come from prison labor. The incarcerated are a hyper-exploited class unto themselves, and almost no one seems to be helping them to organize.

My SO was talking about this just now. They say there ain’t no jobs here but there’s always jobs in prison. He was working everyday to make $11 a month. They know what they’re doing.

whatisthat-velvet:

angry-hippo:

socialismartnature:

The food you eat or brush you’re using may have been made by a worker earning less than a dollar an hour — not in the developing world, but in the invisible workforce inside America’s prisons. Share this if you oppose prison labor for profit.

Source: http://ow.ly/iwTlY

When I was in prison I worked 3 shifts a day, 5 days a week, starting at 5 AM and ending at 8 PM. I was paid $5.25 a month. Pay for the inmates who facilitate UNICOR workers (by making their food, washing their laundry, etc,) is even lower than the wages cited in the above graphics. The prison industry is also a slave industry, and it isn’t just corporations who benefit. All the furniture you see in federal buildings, post offices, DMVs, etc, where do you think it comes from? Prison labor. I think a lot of people know about states that use prison labor for license plates, but fewer people know that the plaques on doors at city halls, and sometimes the doors themselves, come from prison labor. The incarcerated are a hyper-exploited class unto themselves, and almost no one seems to be helping them to organize.

My SO was talking about this just now. They say there ain’t no jobs here but there’s always jobs in prison. He was working everyday to make $11 a month. They know what they’re doing.

sweetheartpleasestay:

queenconsuelabananahammock:

voguememoirs:

theroguefeminist:

elliedoh:

So when Miley Cyrus or Katy Perry bring black girls on stage, dance with them, acknowledge their figures- it’s offensive and appropriating. But, when Nicki Minaj makes an entire video focusing around black girl’s asses and asserts her power, reduces these women to objects and flaunts her authority it’s YAAASSSSS NICKI SERVE IT. Is that because she’s black? So it’s okay for people of the same race to dance with each other but someone who does not share the same levels of melanin enters the picture, they’re doing something wrong? …idgi 

You’re completely ignoring context. In Lily Allen’s Hard out Here video, she literally says, “I don’t shake my ass cause I have a brain” as Black women shake their asses in her video. She is literally degrading the Black women who shake their asses in the media. The song also uses references to Black rappers (i.e. the title of the song referencing the rap song “Hard out Here for a Pimp” and her lyric “bragging ‘bout my cars or talking ‘bout my chains”), suggesting that Black rappers are more sexist than white male musicians (which isn’t true, there’s lots of sexism in all music genres) and also suggest the source of sexism in the music industry is Black people (Black male rappers and twerking Black female dancers).
In contrast, Nicki Minaj is reclaiming a song (Baby Got Back) that was made by a Black male rapper who celebrated (but also objectified) Black female bodies. Throughout her song, Nicki raps like a man would, talking about her sexual conquests with men and the size of their dicks, almost as a way of doing to men what they have done to women (objectifying their dicks as Sir Mix A Lot objectified Black women’s asses and many other men objectify women’s vaginas). She also brags about her sexual prowess and stays in control and aggressive in the video (she goes as far as cutting a banana representing a dick and slapping Drake’s hand away—the video critiques the male gaze). The target of mockery and disparagement in Nicki’s video is men and the male gaze, and the video works to reclaim agency from it.
In what way is Nicki asserting power over her dancers? In her video, she twerks along side her back up dancers and dances with them and interacts with them on the same level. She is just as scantily clad as they are. Lily Allen, however, stays fully covered in her video, does not dance provocatively, and thus contrasts her own pure and respectable femininity with the Black women, using their twerking and scantily clad bodies as an example of “bad” female sexuality and femininity—of women “objectifying themselves.” This is racist because it frames Black female sexuality as lesser than white femininity and antithetical to feminism.
In summary: Nicki’s video is very much a celebration of female Black beauty and sexuality coming from a Black woman. Conversely, Lilly Allen’s is using Black women as props to frame them as a vile or bad form of sexuality or being too sexual to prop up her own feminism.
So you might say, “what about Miley Cyrus? she twerks along side her Black background dancers too!” But here’s the problem: Miley Cyrus continually appropriates Black culture and also uses Black women as props. It does matter that these artists are white because in these cases the point of including the Black women is either to, in Lily Allen’s case, offset Black sexuality/femininity as too sexual or bad in comparison with her white femininity/feminism, or, in the case of Miley Cyrus, to get “street cred” and exotify her own sexuality by appropriating Black culture and using Black people as props to do so. See this analysis of Lily Allen’s Hard Out Here video and this analysis of Miley Cyrus by Black people who know a lot more about this than I do.
I haven’t seen anything about Katy Perry using Black dancers. I’ve just seen criticisms of her appropriating AAVE and other PoC cultures. So I’m not sure why you brought her up, but maybe I just haven’t seen the videos in question.
Either way, it’s not like white artists having a diverse cast of back up dancers is a bad thing automatically. Here is an example of a white artist using back up dancers of other races without objectifying them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ilh1ewceco (notice this artist tackles the same issue as Lily Allen—sexism/objectification in the media—without being misogynist and racist toward other women). But the examples of Lily Allen and Miley Cyrus ARE racist and Nicki Minaj’s video isn’t the same as theirs.

SLAY!

OP, you tried it

FOH WITH YOUR ANTI-ONIKA BULLSHIT AIN’T NOBODY HERE FOR THAT BOO SHE SLAYED AND WILL CONTINUE TO SLAY YOU MAD.

sweetheartpleasestay:

queenconsuelabananahammock:

voguememoirs:

theroguefeminist:

elliedoh:

So when Miley Cyrus or Katy Perry bring black girls on stage, dance with them, acknowledge their figures- it’s offensive and appropriating. But, when Nicki Minaj makes an entire video focusing around black girl’s asses and asserts her power, reduces these women to objects and flaunts her authority it’s YAAASSSSS NICKI SERVE IT. Is that because she’s black? So it’s okay for people of the same race to dance with each other but someone who does not share the same levels of melanin enters the picture, they’re doing something wrong? …idgi 

You’re completely ignoring context. In Lily Allen’s Hard out Here video, she literally says, “I don’t shake my ass cause I have a brain” as Black women shake their asses in her video. She is literally degrading the Black women who shake their asses in the media. The song also uses references to Black rappers (i.e. the title of the song referencing the rap song “Hard out Here for a Pimp” and her lyric “bragging ‘bout my cars or talking ‘bout my chains”), suggesting that Black rappers are more sexist than white male musicians (which isn’t true, there’s lots of sexism in all music genres) and also suggest the source of sexism in the music industry is Black people (Black male rappers and twerking Black female dancers).

In contrast, Nicki Minaj is reclaiming a song (Baby Got Back) that was made by a Black male rapper who celebrated (but also objectified) Black female bodies. Throughout her song, Nicki raps like a man would, talking about her sexual conquests with men and the size of their dicks, almost as a way of doing to men what they have done to women (objectifying their dicks as Sir Mix A Lot objectified Black women’s asses and many other men objectify women’s vaginas). She also brags about her sexual prowess and stays in control and aggressive in the video (she goes as far as cutting a banana representing a dick and slapping Drake’s hand away—the video critiques the male gaze). The target of mockery and disparagement in Nicki’s video is men and the male gaze, and the video works to reclaim agency from it.

In what way is Nicki asserting power over her dancers? In her video, she twerks along side her back up dancers and dances with them and interacts with them on the same level. She is just as scantily clad as they are. Lily Allen, however, stays fully covered in her video, does not dance provocatively, and thus contrasts her own pure and respectable femininity with the Black women, using their twerking and scantily clad bodies as an example of “bad” female sexuality and femininity—of women “objectifying themselves.” This is racist because it frames Black female sexuality as lesser than white femininity and antithetical to feminism.

In summary: Nicki’s video is very much a celebration of female Black beauty and sexuality coming from a Black woman. Conversely, Lilly Allen’s is using Black women as props to frame them as a vile or bad form of sexuality or being too sexual to prop up her own feminism.

So you might say, “what about Miley Cyrus? she twerks along side her Black background dancers too!” But here’s the problem: Miley Cyrus continually appropriates Black culture and also uses Black women as props. It does matter that these artists are white because in these cases the point of including the Black women is either to, in Lily Allen’s case, offset Black sexuality/femininity as too sexual or bad in comparison with her white femininity/feminism, or, in the case of Miley Cyrus, to get “street cred” and exotify her own sexuality by appropriating Black culture and using Black people as props to do so. See this analysis of Lily Allen’s Hard Out Here video and this analysis of Miley Cyrus by Black people who know a lot more about this than I do.

I haven’t seen anything about Katy Perry using Black dancers. I’ve just seen criticisms of her appropriating AAVE and other PoC cultures. So I’m not sure why you brought her up, but maybe I just haven’t seen the videos in question.

Either way, it’s not like white artists having a diverse cast of back up dancers is a bad thing automatically. Here is an example of a white artist using back up dancers of other races without objectifying them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ilh1ewceco (notice this artist tackles the same issue as Lily Allen—sexism/objectification in the media—without being misogynist and racist toward other women). But the examples of Lily Allen and Miley Cyrus ARE racist and Nicki Minaj’s video isn’t the same as theirs.

SLAY!

OP, you tried it

FOH WITH YOUR ANTI-ONIKA BULLSHIT AIN’T NOBODY HERE FOR THAT BOO SHE SLAYED AND WILL CONTINUE TO SLAY YOU MAD.

»Video games(main menu)

Oh my. I thought it would be obvious that this conversation was about laws in place today. Everyone knows about the Crow Laws, anyone who went to third grade. My point is still valid, whether or not you think it's relevant. I responded to your well made point about racism being more about government oppression, and I did it quite well I think. Deflect if you will, what can I do.

whatwhiteswillneverknow:

No, not deflecting. 

Just showing stuff. Past stuff was one.

I see you want present day stuff. So, I give you this.

With the Voting Rights Act of 1965 out of the way, Republicans are doing their best to make sure that voting fraud doesn’t happen because according to them, it’s a problem that is rampant in the last few elections.

One problem with the statement tho.

In the 2012 election, there were only 121 cases reported. That’s 0.00174%. Just so you know, that is way less than 1%. Genetic testing have a 3% error and THAT’s a lot higher than the case of voter’s fraud.

And true, while it’s not saying outright that Blacks are affected… let’s see what are the stats of people that don’t have IDs? 

A full 25 percent of African-Americans do not possess adequate ID, and, contrary to an all too popular belief, it is not for lack of trying. Acquiring an ID requires time and money, precisely the two things poor urban minorities do not have. - [source]

This is one law that I can think of off the top of my head that have systemic racial problems in it.

I’m pretty sure there’s followers that can tell you something independently. 

The whole War on Drugs. Does the whole Criminal Justice System count? …I’m going to say yes. Rezoning, redistricting and other policies that permit redlining and such and its consequences. Etc. And I say “etc.”, because there’s Google for that.

Just because a policy doesn’t explicitly say “mistreat black people”, doesn’t mean that there isn’t an intended target.

acceber74:

notyouraveragesjw:

thunderboltsortofapenny:

theorlandojones:

This is a very serious disease* so I gladly accept the “bucket challenge”

*My heart goes out to all those who struggle with ALS but I am, of course, talking about the disease of apathy.  If (and hopefully when) Michael Brown’s killer is brought to justice and convicted of 1st degree murder, it still won’t prevent this from happening again. We cannot accept this as the status quo. We MUST continue the fight at the ballot box, in the media and by working to create systemic change. I’m not naive to the dirty politics (redistricting, voter ID requirements, etc) that will try to prevent us from our goal. But I refuse to give up hope. My “bullet bucket challenge” is not about pointing fingers and it’s not about being angry. Every shell casing in that bucket represents the life of someone who fought and died in the goal for civil rights and human dignity. As a member of law enforcement (yes I really am a reserve sheriff) I will not stand idly by while others violate civil and human rights under the cover of authority and I will insist that other good cops rise to the same standard as well. As a black man I will demand more from myself and my community. I will not allow outsiders to co-opt our struggle in order to commit violence in our name. I’m challenging my outrage into action so I no longer feel powerless. It’s not about black or white. It’s not about rich or poor. It’s about us vs. them. There are more of us — from all races, genders and identities — then there will ever be of them. And we will be victorious”

"The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of great moral crisis, maintain their neutrality"

Join me.

NOT

IN

THE

VICINITY

OF

FUCKING

AROUND

Jeez, I’m the first to say that what’s happening in Ferguson is terrible, that USAmerican society has a hug problem with racism, guns and cops and that these morons should remember they’re not cow-boys in the West. I’m the first to say there needs to be justice for Michael Brown and all black people gunned down by trigger happy cops. 

But Orlando Jones isn’t the only one to have talked about the ASL challenge and twisted it to make it about Ferguson, and this is some plain disrespectful shit here. It’s basically a big fuck you to all the people who struggle with a barely known disease. It’s like “Oh you’re dying and suffering? You want funds to help fighting this disease? Well we’re hurt too so we’re gonna steal the light.” 

They could do anything else, but no, let’s shit on sick people, they have it easy after all, black people are more important than disabled people. 

You do realize that there are disabled black people, right? You do realize that disabled black people are being killed too, right?  That disabled black people are being harassed by cops too, right?  

Or did you think black people with disabilities get a pass on police harassment?

http://thedailybanter.com/2014/08/la-police-shoot-kill-unarmed-mentally-disabled-black-man-ezell-ford/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danziger_Bridge_shootings

http://ourweekly.com/news/2014/aug/12/mentally-ill-man-shot-killed-police/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xifmR0C3Mk

Have a seat. 

scottmcrogers:

yooooo! thats the girl who brought the milk! Look!

scottmcrogers:

yooooo! thats the girl who brought the milk! Look!